Adding Power Fallback and Redundancy without the Expense of New Dual Inlet Devices

In most modern business operations, the network is the vital part of the corporate infrastructure; when the network is down, the pace of business often slows to a crawl, communication stops and many important resources are simply unavailable. With this in mind, one of the main goals of most network administrators is to ensure network reliability; this means that network administrators will generally do everything in their power to ensure that the network is up, running and available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

One of the most important factors in ensuring network reliability is a power fallback or power redundancy solution, that will allow network equipment to continue to function even in the event of a power interruption. Unfortunately, one of the main obstacles that administrators encounter when attempting to implement a power redundancy solution, is the cost of replacing existing, single-power-inlet network devices with brand new dual-power-inlet network devices. In many cases, the cost of refitting an existing network installation for power redundancy can run into tens of thousands of dollars in equipment replacement costs, as well as weeks of man-hours to ensure that new dual-inlet devices are compatible with existing network infrastructure.

Fortunately, a power transfer switch provides a simple-yet-effective solution to the challenge of adding power fallback capabilities to your existing network infrastructure. A power transfer switch allows you to continue using your existing single power inlet devices, yet still implement an effective power fallback solution; rather than connecting each network element to a primary and secondary power supply, the primary and secondary power feeds are instead connected to the power transfer switch and the power transfer switch is then connected to your single-inlet network devices.

Installation and operation of the power transfer switch is extremely simple. After the primary and secondary power feeds have been connected to the power transfer switch and your single inlet network element has been connected to the power transfer switch, the power transfer switch will closely monitor the primary power feed, and automatically switch over to the secondary power source in the event that the primary power source becomes unstable. A high quality power transfer switch can often provide switch over times as fast as eight to twelve microseconds; quick enough that the switchover will generally be undetectable by both users and equipment. After a primary to secondary power switchover occurs, the power transfer switch can also switch back to the primary power source if it detects that the primary power source has stabilized or resumed operation.

Most power transfer switch products require no configuration, and since the power transfer switch allows you to continue using existing single power inlet devices, this also eliminates the task of configuring new dual inlet network elements for compatibility with your existing network infrastructure. As mentioned before, installing a power transfer switch is also incredible easy and trouble free; the only tasks are connecting the power transfer switch to your primary and secondary power feeds and then connecting your single inlet devices to the power transfer switch.

Power transfer switch products are usually available in either 120 VAC or 240 VAC configurations, and are also available with a variety of outlet types and configurations to fit the needs of almost any network power redundancy solution. In addition, power transfer switch units are rack mountable and generally require only one rack unit of mounting space.

Power redundancy and power fallback capabilities are obviously an indispensable element of many large corporate networks. But there’s no need to spend tens of thousands of dollars replacing existing single power inlet devices or waste weeks of man hours adapting those devices for use with your existing equipment. A power transfer switch allows you to quickly add power fallback capabilities to your network application, without the need to replace single power inlet devices or make configuration changes to ensure compatibility with new dual inlet devices.

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