Archive for the ‘remote console server’ Category

Different Serial Port Modes for Different Remote Console Server Applications

Tuesday, September 13th, 2011

In many out of band management applications, a remote console server is often called upon to serve a wide variety of different types of applications with different access requirements and port connection needs. One application might require the connection of an external modem to a console server port, another application might require the ability to buffer data received at a console server port and yet another application might simply require the ability to create connections between various console server serial ports. In cases like this, network administrators are sometimes faced with a difficult challenge: how can the remote console server satisfy the different needs of these diverse applications while still providing the basic out of band management functions that are generally expected from a remote console server?

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Power Redundancy Ensures Remote Console Server Access When You Need It the Most

Friday, July 22nd, 2011

When malfunctioning network equipment at a remote equipment rack brings network communication to a halt, a remote console server can often provide a secure, reliable means to access console port command functions on the afflicted network element in order to restore network communication without an expensive, time-consuming service call to the remote equipment rack. Given the powerful remote diagnostic and troubleshooting capabilities provided by a remote console server, it’s easy to see that when problems arise at a remote network equipment rack, it’s absolutely vital that the remote console server is ready and able to help support personnel to take care of the problem, and that’s why it’s also important that the remote console server includes power redundancy and power fallback capabilities.

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A DC Powered Remote Console Server is the Perfect Solution for Remote Equipment Racks

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

Due to the very nature of some network applications, many remote network equipment racks are located so far off of the beaten track, that they’re beyond the reach of AC power lines and sometimes even beyond the reach of internet cables. In spite of the isolated locations of these remote equipment racks, network administrators still need a means to communicate with the devices at the remote site in order to retrieve data, issue configuration commands and check device status. A DC powered remote console server (http://www.wti.com/c-47-remote-console-servers.aspx) provides an ideal tool for administrators who need out of band management capabilities for remote network elements in environments where only DC Power is available and communication with the outside world is limited to dial-up or satellite modem.

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Different Serial Port Modes for Different Remote Console Server Port Applications

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

In many applications, a remote console server needs to be able to perform other tasks besides providing out of band management access to console ports on remote network devices. In a remote network equipment rack, it’s pretty common to see a remote console server that’s not only being used for out of band access, but also to collect status and error messages from attached devices or to provide access to an external modem in the equipment rack. In situations like this, it’s extremely helpful to have a remote console server that includes the ability to redefine serial ports for specialized tasks.

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Power Fallback Makes Perfect Sense for Remote Console Server Applications

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

The “heart” of any out of band management application is a remote console server. A remote console server provides secure out of band access to console port command functions on remote devices, allows remote monitoring of environmental conditions and device status at remote network equipment sites, and also helps network administrators to know when critical network elements at remote sites fail to respond to communication. Given the importance of these many vital functions, it’s plain to see the value of a remote console server that includes power fallback capabilities to ensure continuing out of band access in the event of power disruptions at the remote network equipment site.

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The Advantages of a Remote Console Server with Monitoring and Alarm Features

Tuesday, May 17th, 2011

One of the most common challenges to those who manage remote network equipment sites, is the need to know exactly what’s going on at those remote sites. If an equipment rack is located just down the hall, then checking environmental conditions and communication status is obviously easy, but if that equipment rack is located hundreds or even thousands of miles away, then how can a network administrator know when rack temperatures are too high or power conditions are unstable? A remote console server provides a simple solution to this challenge; in addition to providing out of band access to console port command functions on remote devices, a full-featured remote console server can also help to track events and conditions at remote network equipment sites.

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A DC Powered Remote Console Server Provides the Perfect Fit for Remote Network Site Administration

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

Due to their very nature, remote network equipment sites are often located far off the beaten path, well out of the reach of network cables and AC power lines. In cases like this, a remote console server (http://www.wti.com/c-47-remote-console-servers.aspx) that runs on DC power and supports secure communication via dial-up and satellite modem provides the only workable solution for out of band management.

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Remote Console Servers Help to Track Conditions at Faraway Network Equipment Sites

Tuesday, April 19th, 2011

In addition to providing secure access to command functions on remote network elements, a remote console server can also help network administrators keep track of environmental conditions and other noteworthy events at remote network equipment sites. When a remote console server is equipped with monitoring and alarm functions, this allows network administrators and IT support personnel to be automatically notified when high rack temperatures, power supply interruptions, ping response failure and other significant incidents are detected.

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Power Fallback – A Vital Capability for Remote Console Servers in Mission Critical Applications

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

Most network administrators who are responsible for the management remote network equipment sites are already familiar with the value and convenience of a remote console server. Considering the importance of the out of band management capabilities that are provided by a remote console server, it makes perfect sense to ensure that the remote console server is always ready to use when it’s needed the most. One way to improve the reliability of an out of band management solution, is to make certain to choose a remote console server unit that includes dual power inlets and power fallback capabilities.

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A Remote Console Server with Dual Power Inlets and Power Fallback Capabilities

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011

Most network administrators are well aware of the value of a remote console server; remote console servers provide quick, reliable out of band access to console port command functions on remote network elements, even when the main network is down. Given the importance of a remote console server in out of band management applications, it makes sense to take steps to ensure that the remote console server is always available when it’s needed. That’s why WTI’s TSM-24 and TSM-40 series Remote Console Server units are available with a dual power input configuration, with automatic fallback capability.

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