Posts Tagged ‘encryption’

HTTPS Everywhere Now Warns About Encryption Weaknesses

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

If you’re concerned about security (and aren’t we all,) here’s a Firefox add-on that helps to detect encryption weaknesses in routers, firewalls and other devices …

Two weeks ago a team of mathematicians and cryptographers released a paper in which they described a weakness in the encryption used by routers, firewalls, web services or virtual private network. The flaw, affecting only a small number of cases where the random prime number generation fails to work correctly.

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Should You Share an Internet Connection with Your Neighbor?

Friday, January 20th, 2012

An IP Address Filter provides a good start towards wireless security, but you need to enable encryption in order to discourage determined hackers …

Sharing an Internet connection with other household members or even neighbors is easier than ever. All you need is a solid wireless router with enough reach to give all parties lag- and trouble-free access to the Internet. All you need for that is to set up a wireless router in a location that is ideal for everyone, share the access key and you are good to go. You can add wireless repeaters and other hardware to the mix if you need to cover a wider area.

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Secure Communication with a Console Server that Supports SSHv2 Encryption

Friday, December 16th, 2011

A console server can provide network administrators with many convenient tools that simplify the task of managing network elements located at off-site data centers and remote equipment racks. When a device at a distant network equipment site suddenly crashes and takes your network down with it, a console server allows out of band access to console port command functions on the malfunctioning device, and often eliminates the need for an expensive service call to the remote network site that would otherwise be required in order to address the problem in person.

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Researchers Successfully Hack HDCP High-Def Copy Protection

Thursday, December 1st, 2011

More evidence that there’s really no such thing as “uncrackable” security …

Ever since the Blu-Ray video format was first announced, it has been claimed that the copy-protection on the system was uncrackable.  This is because is uses technology in your HDMI port to determine the authenticity of the video source.  Without this technology built into the port’s circuitry Blu-Ray video simply won’t work, which caused problems with some early HDMI-equipped computer monitors.

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Secure Communication with a Console Server that Supports SSHv2 Encryption

Monday, November 7th, 2011

A console server can provide network administrators with many convenient tools that simplify the task of managing network elements located at off-site data centers and remote equipment racks. When a device at a distant network equipment site suddenly crashes and takes your network down with it, a console server allows out of band access to console port command functions on the malfunctioning device, and often eliminates the need for an expensive service call to the remote network site that would otherwise be required in order to address the problem in person.

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Types of Wi-Fi Encryption You Can Use

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

This is a nice, concise, side-by-side comparison of the most popular wi-fi encryption standards …

There are many types of Wi-Fi encryption you can use on modern Internet routers. So which one should you use? Many people don’t even use encryption, and those that do just pick an encryption type at random without knowing what they do. Most encryption types are better than nothing at all, but some are more suitable than others.

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Sega Loses 1.29 Million People’s Data in Hack!

Monday, June 20th, 2011

Here’s another reminder that when it comes to corporate networks, there’s no such thing as “too much” security …

Sega is the latest company to admit to being hacked and has admitted that in a recent attack on its computer systems, the personal details of 1.29 million customers was stolen.

The news first emerged on Friday when they said that the email addresses and dates of birth of customers on its Sega Pass database had been accessed by hackers.  Now the larger admission will be hugely embarrassing to the company.

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Why You Need to Protect Your Data in the Cloud

Friday, April 22nd, 2011

Here’s one to file under, “We All Knew This was Going to Happen Sooner or Later” …

Several events recently have shown some of the weaknesses, or dangers, of cloud based hosting, and the need for information and guides to aid users in protecting their data in the cloud. To keep it simple: The cloud in the context of this article refers to all remote storage locations that you do not have full control over. This includes your Dropbox account, your videos on Youtube or the data that you upload to Facebook.

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Toshiba Self-Encrypting Hard Drives with Host Authorization

Wednesday, April 20th, 2011

This is a great idea; it’s kind of surprising that this feature isn’t more wide spread …

The best way to protect data on one of your storage devices is to encrypt it. There are several free solutions out there, for instance by using the Open Source encryption software True Crypt, to protect data from unauthorized access.

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Disguising True Crypt Volumes in MP4 Videos

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

I hope somebody doesn’t figure out a way to use this to hide malware inside of MP4 videos …

I have reviewed TCHunt yesterday, a free program to scan a computer system for unmounted True Crypt containers. The program can be used to prove the existence of an encrypted container on a one of the connected storage devices. What it cannot do is to decrypt the data, but proof of existence of an encrypted volume may be enough to get you into troubles.

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