Posts Tagged ‘firefox’

Firefox Focus Privacy Scandal

Wednesday, February 15th, 2017

“Scandal” might be overstating things a bit, but it turns out that Firefox’s new, privacy-oriented mobile browser isn’t as private as one might assume.

Firefox Focus: the privacy browser, is a free mobile browser for iOS devices by Mozilla designed to protect user privacy while browsing the web. The app “improves the privacy and performance” of a user’s mobile browsing experience by “blocking analytics, social, and advertising trackers” according to the product description on Apple’s iTunes website. It furthermore enables you to erase the browsing history, passwords and cookies easily.

(more…)

Time to Make the Switch to 64-Bit Firefox on Windows

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

Now that Mozilla is dropping support for NPAPI plug-ins, there’s really no reason to stick with the 34-bit version of Firefox.

The story of 64-bit Firefox on Windows is a long and complex one, and it is just about to end with Mozilla moving from offering 32-bit Firefox as the default download option to offering 64-bit Firefox on Windows by default.

(more…)

Firefox 52 – How to Keep on Using Plugins

Monday, February 6th, 2017

Apparently, plugins are on their way out. Fortunately though, there’s still a way to tweak Firefox to keep your favorite plugins running.

Firefox 52 will be the first release version of the Mozilla Firefox web browser that will ship without support for NPAPI plugins. The only exception to the rule is that Firefox 52 will support Adobe Flash. All other plugins, Silverlight, Java, and all the others, won’t be supported anymore in the Firefox version. While plugin use is on the decline, scenarios exist where plugins are still required to use sites or services on the Internet.

(more…)

How to Change Firefox’s Sandbox Security Level

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

Here’s an interesting trick …

One of the major improvements that comes along with Firefox’s new multi-process architecture is sandboxing to improve the browser’s security. The multi-process rollout is chugging along nicely, but it will still take at least months before it is enabled by default for all, or at least the majority, of Firefox Stable users. Electrolysis, Firefox’s multi-process architecture, is the prerequisite for Firefox’s sandboxing feature as it makes use of child processes to establish security boundaries.

(more…)

This is Firefox’s Upcoming Permissions System

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Here’s a quick summary of the changes that are coming to Firefox’s permissions system …

Back in mid-2016 we gave you a glimpse of the new permissions system that Mozilla was working on at the time for its Firefox web browser. Mozilla worked on it a bit more in the meantime, and plans to launch an updated version of it soon that improves the user interaction with permissions in several ways.

(more…)

What’s in Store for Firefox in 2017?

Wednesday, January 4th, 2017

Here’s a quick peek at some of the changes that Mozilla has tentatively planned for Firefox in the upcoming year …

The year 2017 will be an interesting one for the Firefox web browser, Mozilla, and users of the browser. 2017 will see new technology being integrated in Firefox, and also some removed. The following guide lists those changes. It needs to be noted though that some may or may not happen. I mention that explicitly if that is the case so that you know that a change is not a done deal but something that could happen.

(more…)

How to Research Firefox Crashes

Friday, November 11th, 2016

If you’ve been having trouble with Firefox crashing lately, this might help …

Firefox Nightly has been crashing on me for the past three days. The browser starts up fine, but it crashes after about a minute has passed even if I don’t do anything. One thing that is strange and noticeable is that Firefox nightly spawns two windows, one blank without title or any other information, and the the main browser window. Clues are scarce usually when the browser crashes. While you may link it to your previous action, it is often not as easy as that. The following guide provides you with the means to analyze crashes in Firefox.

(more…)

Behavioral Keyboard Privacy Add-On for Firefox

Tuesday, October 25th, 2016

It’s amazing to see the lengths that some web sites will go to in order to track the browsing habits of their users. It’s equally amazing to see the lengths that some users will go to in order to avoid be tracked.

Behavioral Keyboard Privacy is an experimental add-on for Mozilla Firefox that prevents you from being profiled based on how you type. Did you know that there are companies out there that track you based on how you type? They have developed methods that track your typing patterns; how fast you type, how long you dwell on keys, how long it takes for the next key to be pressed and so on.

(more…)

Firefox 49: Two New System Add-Ons to Fix Flash and Graphics Issues

Friday, October 21st, 2016

If you have automatic updates enabled for Firefox, then you probably already have these add-ons. But there’s also a way to check to see if they’re installed if you’re unsure.

Mozilla has started to distribute two new system add-ons for Firefox 49.0 and Firefox 49.0.1 to address two issues affecting Adobe Flash Player and graphics issues. The organization is working on Firefox 49.0.2 currently, but made the decision to release two new patches for the current stable version of Firefox as system add-ons to address issues that users are affected by. System add-ons are like hotfixes. They can be pushed out to all Firefox users who have automatic updates enabled to fix issues of the browser. That’s usually a lot faster than having to create a new build of Firefox.

(more…)

Firefox Blocks Weak Diffie-Hellman Keys

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

If you manage a web site that supports encryption, it’s time to make sure that your Diffie-Hellman keys are up to snuff.

Mozilla announced on September 30, 2016 that it made the decision to enforce stronger Diffie-Hellman keys in the Firefox web browser. Firefox users who visit websites that use weak — now less than1023 bits — will see a connection error message in the web browser instead of the actual site.

(more…)