Posts Tagged ‘flash’

After Ignoring Linux for Years, Adobe Releases Flash 24 for Linux

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

With so many Windows based browsers slowly stepping away from Flash, perhaps Adobe sees Linux as the one place where Flash could still thrive. But why have they waited so long to take action?

Adobe has just released the first final Adobe Flash Player stable release, Flash Player 24, for GNU/Linux in years. The company announced back in September 2016 that it would bring back Flash for Linux from the dead. This came as a surprise as it had ignored Linux for the most part when it comes to Flash.

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Google Chrome HTML5 Roll-Out Plan

Monday, December 12th, 2016

Here’s a look forward at Google’s plans for handling the transition from Flash to HTML5.

Google revealed yesterday how it plans to make the shift to prioritizing HTML5 over Flash in the company’s Chrome browser. The company announced previously that it will deprioritize Flash content on the web in favor of HTML5 content. The decision left many questions unanswered: will Chrome block all Flash content eventually? What is the time frame for the change? What happens to sites that only support Flash but not HTML5?

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Flash Tops the Exploit Kits Chart in 2016 Again

Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

This is the reason why so many browsers and websites are abandoning Flash in favor of HTML5.

If you needed another reason not to use Flash anymore, a new security report by Recorded Future may convince you to consider this at the very least. The company analyzed 141 exploits kits that were available between November 16, 2015 and November 15, 2016. The main takeaway of the research study is that Adobe Flash vulnerabilities made up six of the top ten chart spots.

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Firefox 49: Two New System Add-Ons to Fix Flash and Graphics Issues

Friday, October 21st, 2016

If you have automatic updates enabled for Firefox, then you probably already have these add-ons. But there’s also a way to check to see if they’re installed if you’re unsure.

Mozilla has started to distribute two new system add-ons for Firefox 49.0 and Firefox 49.0.1 to address two issues affecting Adobe Flash Player and graphics issues. The organization is working on Firefox 49.0.2 currently, but made the decision to release two new patches for the current stable version of Firefox as system add-ons to address issues that users are affected by. System add-ons are like hotfixes. They can be pushed out to all Firefox users who have automatic updates enabled to fix issues of the browser. That’s usually a lot faster than having to create a new build of Firefox.

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Mozilla may bring Pepper Flash to Firefox

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

With the end of support for NPAPI plug-ins, many browsers will be exploring alternative avenues for continuing support for popular formats such as Flash and PDF.

Browser plugins are fading into obscurity, at least when it comes to those using the ancient NPAPI interface for integration with browsers. All major browser companies and organizations announced the end of support for NPAPI plugins. While some block plugins already (Chrome), others will do so in the near future (Firefox) or shipped without support for plugins out of the box (Edge).

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Adobe Resurrects Flash for Linux from the Dead

Friday, September 9th, 2016

It’s somewhat strange that this took so long …

Adobe just announced that it made the decision to bring Flash for Linux up to sync with Flash for other operating systems. This means that Linux users will have access to the latest Flash releases just like users on other operating systems had for the past four years. While Linux users could use Google Chrome or a comparable browser that ships with its own Flash version, those on Firefox or other browsers had to rely on an old version of Flash, and some command line fu to get it to work.

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Google Chrome to Block More Flash Content

Friday, August 12th, 2016

The handwriting is already on the wall, and this move by Google will most like help to hasten the Flash plug-in’s demise.

Flash is a dying technology in its plugin-form, and Google plans to push Flash a bit further to the graveyard by making two Flash-related changes in future versions of Chrome. The first change will block behind the scenes Flash content, which is usually used for page analytics and tracking.

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Speed up Edge by Disabling Flash

Monday, August 8th, 2016

Edge definitely runs relatively slow when compared to other browsers … but I’m not sure if disabling Flash is really a practical answer to that problem.

One of the annoyances of Microsoft Edge that I experience whenever I use the web browser is that it lags at times. This is noticeable for instance when websites are loaded from external sources but also at other occasions. When a website loads for instance, it lags until all content is loaded. The loading itself seems to take longer than when other browsers are used but I could never put my finger down on the cause for this as it only happens on some sites and not all of them.

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How to Stop Auto Playing Videos

Friday, May 6th, 2016

In the larger scheme of things, auto-playing videos are generally a rather minor annoyance … but it’s still cool to know how to stop them.

Many sites throughout the Internet play videos automatically when you visit them. This can be video content that is published on the site or in form of advertisement displayed on the site. In the case of advertisement, most sites mute these videos by default but some are pushing it and turn on audio as well. Most web browsers ship with muting functionality to counter these without you having to hunt the tab where the sound is coming from these days, but muting won’t stop the video from playing.

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Tip: Use a Secondary Browser for Java, Flash and Other Plugins

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

This is a helpful tip, but it also goes without saying that certain plugins work better on some browsers than they do on others.

While most browser makers plan to drop support for Java, Flash and other plugins such as Silverlight or Quicktime, or have stopped supporting these technologies already, there are still a lot of sites and services out there that can only be accessed if certain plugins are installed in the browser. If you take Google Chrome for instance you will quickly notice that it supports Flash thanks to a native integration of the technology but no other plugin. This means that Chrome users cannot access content on the Internet that require Silverlight, Java or other plugins.

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