Posts Tagged ‘google’

Google Chrome HTML5 Roll-Out Plan

Monday, December 12th, 2016

Here’s a look forward at Google’s plans for handling the transition from Flash to HTML5.

Google revealed yesterday how it plans to make the shift to prioritizing HTML5 over Flash in the company’s Chrome browser. The company announced previously that it will deprioritize Flash content on the web in favor of HTML5 content. The decision left many questions unanswered: will Chrome block all Flash content eventually? What is the time frame for the change? What happens to sites that only support Flash but not HTML5?

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Google is about to Roll Out Invisible Captchas

Monday, December 5th, 2016

Google will release a new solution for keeping bots from logging on to your web site

Google is about to roll out an updated version of the company’s captcha protection that tries to determine whether a connection was made by a user or Mr. Roboto. Captchas are designed to separate between humans and bots. While sites may want to allow entrance to all human visitors, they may not be as forthcoming when it comes to bots.

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Mozilla and Google Remove WOT Extension from Stores

Monday, November 7th, 2016

It turns out that the Web of Trust add-on wasn’t exactly trustworthy when it came to user privacy.

The popular browser extension Web of Trust is no longer available on the Firefox add-on repository or the Google Chrome Web Store. Mozilla and Google have pulled the extension from their stores after a report aired on German national television that the company was selling the browsing history of its users.

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Google Intensifies Tracking: Check Your Privacy Settings

Monday, October 24th, 2016

If you’d rather not be served ads for everything that you search for and mention on Google, you might want to take a look at the privacy settings recommended by this article.

Google made a significant change to the company’s privacy policy recently which changes in a significant way how the company is tracking users on the Internet. Previously, the company kept its DoubleClick advertising engine apart from its core user services such as Gmail, Search or YouTube. While users could give Google consent to use the information for advertising, it required users to become active and opt-in for that.

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Ungoogled-Chromium Removes Google Traces from Chromium

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016

If you love the functionality of Google’s Chrome browser, but would rather do without Google’s habit of collecting information regarding every move you make online, then you should probably take a look at Ungoogled-Chromium.

Ungoogled-Chromium is a fork of Chromium that puts the focus on privacy and security by removing Google traces and other bits of code from the browser that weaken privacy. The custom browser is available for Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, and as source code. Chromium is an open source web browser that Google Chrome and other browsers such as Vivaldi or Opera base their code on.

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Google Translate Neural Translations Promise Better Results

Thursday, September 29th, 2016

Machine translation programs have been around since at least the early 1990s. In the past, the results have always left a lot to be desired, but I suppose that someday, someone will finally get it right.

Google Translate is a widely used translation service by Google that is probably the most used translation service on the Web these days. Google states for instance that the system processes 18 million translations per day from Chinese to English alone. Up until now, Google Translate used a phrase-based translation model to power the translation engine. This method breaks a sentence up into words and phrases, and translates them largely independently from each other.

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Google doesn’t Give Up – YouTube the Next Social Network?

Monday, August 29th, 2016

In many ways, YouTube has always been a social network. The tricky part is that most folks who use the site do so in order to watch videos, rather than socialize.

Google tried to establish a social networking site several times in the past to complete with the almighty Facebook. But even the company’s latest endeavor in the social space, Google Plus, did not work out as planned. If you consider that Google went all in that time, forcefully integrating Google Plus in many of the company services, and pushing it on its prime properties such as Google Search, it is not far-off  to call Google Plus a failure.

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Mozilla Plans to Add Webp Support to Firefox

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

It’s probably too soon to tell if Webp will eventually replace popular image formats such as jpeg and png, but with both Mozilla and Google behind the idea, the odds in favor of Webp must be fairly good.

Mozilla, makers of Firefox and other things, is working on bringing support for the webp format to the Firefox web browser. WebP is an image format developed by Google (based on tech by a company Google acquired) that offers lossy and lossless compression. Google designed the format as an alternative to the aging jpeg image format promising smaller file sizes without reductions in image quality.

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Google Study on the Unwanted Software Industry

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

Google has good reason for this research too; both ad injectors and search hijackers cut into Google’s bottom line.

Google published (PDF document) the results of a one-year study on the Unwanted Software industry last week detailing how networks and their products operate. Unwanted software refers to programs that users don’t really need or want, but that get installed anyway on user systems.

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Chrome 52 Blocks Backspace Back Navigation

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

The official explanation is that very few people were using backspace navigation, but it does sound like Google might have eliminated it because it was easier (and cheaper,) than adding measures to warn users when they were about to leave a page and lose form data.

Google implemented a change in Chrome 52 that blocks the back navigation functionality of the backspace key on the keyboard. Chrome users were able to use backspace on any page to navigate to the previous page in history with a tap on the button. That feature is no longer available with the release of Chrome 52. According to Google, it is all for the user — again — as it prevents the loss of form data when hitting the backspace key accidentally.

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